Elmley

While waiting for the Leica M6 to come back from it’s repair, I thought I would take out my Nikon F60. This camera I had purchased as a sort of replacement for my broken F80 which I found out was uneconomical to have repaired.

The F60 body cost £15 ($20) on eBay couple of years back and I hadn’t used it since receiving the camera. A couple of weeks ago I found on Ffordes Photographic website they had a new old stock Tamron AF 28-80mm ASPH lens for sale for a mere £89.00 ($120.00) which I’m almost certain is half the original price. Both camera and lens are very light, plastic and I wouldn’t hold much hope I you were to drop such a setup on the floor!

So with two rolls of Ilford HP5, I rated for an ISO of 800, I made my way to Elmley Nature reserve. If your wondering how I push the HP5 on a DX coded only camera, I just used -1.5 stop on the exposure compensation. I had seen pictures of the old school building and was part of the old village of Elmley which from what I read was finally given up in the 1920’s. The church had become derelict by the 1960’s and was knocked down leaving just the head stones. Last surviving build from the village is the Grade II listed ‘Kingshill Farmhouse’

Some nice stormy weather was coming in which with the HP5 rated at 800 and a Hoya yellow filter made some contrasty black and white images. Think my favorite is the first picture and while I’m totally geared up to use a Leica rangefinder system, this made quite a refreshing change using this cheap camera setup for some landscape photography. I wasn’t expecting very good results to be honest but was impressed when I first viewed the freshly developed negatives, even more so after I scanned them.

All images shot with the Nikon F60, with a Tamron AF 28-80mm ASPH lens, yellow filter and developed in stock Ilford ID11 for 12 minutes.

5 thoughts on “Elmley”

    1. I used -1.5 stop on the exposure compensation but you only need -1.0 to push the film one stop.
      I added a -0.5 to over expose a half a stop extra for the yellow filter.

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